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Taare Zameen Par

December 27, 2007

So today I finally watched TZP with Gapp and Dilip. I’m not going to launch into well-studied reviews about it. I loved Darsheel Safary. Total <3. There were a lot of poignant moments and a lot of laughter. Something I totally digged was the absence of melodrama. Even so, there are times in the movie that can actually make you cry. Surprisingly, I didn’t. šŸ˜› It wasn’t as hard-hitting as I thought it would be. But what the heck, I loved the movie. [P.S: I didn’t rhyme that on purpose. :P]

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11 Comments leave one →
  1. January 3, 2008 5:16 PM

    err … where was the rhyme ?

  2. January 3, 2008 6:41 PM

    @TUD:
    t wasnā€™t as hard-hitting as I thought it would be.
    But what the heck, I loved the movie.

    This rhyme. Okay, two rhyming sentences. šŸ˜›

  3. January 3, 2008 11:27 PM

    u call that rhyme ? whats rhyming there ?

    inky pinky pinky, father had a donkey … this is a rhyme šŸ˜›

  4. January 4, 2008 4:39 AM

    @TUD:
    Ahem. Be and movie rhyme [Stop manathey vaangifying on blog] šŸ˜›

  5. Sagaro permalink
    January 4, 2008 8:46 AM

    @TUD:
    It is inky pinky and PONKY

  6. January 4, 2008 6:34 PM

    @ suraksha

    try this

    inky pinky BE
    father had a MOVIE !!!

    DOES IT RHYME ???

    @ gapp

    sorry unarchivasapattutaen …. in my attempt to teach her rhyme

  7. January 4, 2008 7:01 PM

    @TUD:
    Okay, let’s get rhyme straightened out. From WordWeb, rhyme the noun is

    Correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)

    Final sounds. Be and moVIE. It sounds similar. It rhymes. I rest my case. šŸ˜›

  8. January 4, 2008 8:27 PM

    @ suraksha

    dictionary.com says: identity in sound of some part, esp. the end, of words or lines of verse.

    and not letters of words …

  9. January 4, 2008 9:13 PM

    @TUD:
    Correct. I wasn’t talking about letters either. An excerpt from Robert Frost’s poem, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening:

    Whose woods these are I think I know.
    His house is in the village, though;
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his woods fill up with snow.

    Here, though and snow have no connection whatsoever as words. But both end with an ‘o’ sound. Therefore, they rhyme. Similarly, both be and movie end with ‘ee’ sounds. Rhyme.

    šŸ˜®

  10. January 4, 2008 9:48 PM

    Miss, miss, English miss, What is tomorrow lesson miss? šŸ˜›

  11. January 4, 2008 11:55 PM

    @ suraksha

    rhyming is all about what u hear with pronounciation – prof dinesh

    so ponky – donky, snowy – joey, snow – though have similar sounds … be ends with a small i while pronouncing while movie ends with a ieeee … do u get the difference ?

    @ karthik

    thats what is called a rhyme … suraksha has to learn from u

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